Foxton Connections
Family Trees William Foxton b.1725 Rev. George Foxton Dr. John Foxton Capt. John Foxton John Greenlaw Foxton Dr. W. Foxton Hayley Col. Justin F G Foxton The Pantons Dr Harold V Foxton Rev. G.F.H. Foxton Postcards 1900-1910 Letters 1805-1920 Electoral Rolls to 1936 Foxton Directory Bell-Armstrong Connections    Home

 

Home
Family Trees
William Foxton b.1725
Rev. George Foxton
Dr. John Foxton
Capt. John Foxton
John Greenlaw Foxton
Dr. W. Foxton Hayley
Col. Justin F G Foxton
The Pantons
Dr Harold V Foxton
Rev. G.F.H. Foxton
Postcards 1900-1910
Letters 1805-1920
Electoral Rolls to 1936
Foxton Directory   

Bell-Armstrong Site
PNG Connections

Rootsweb Database

Contact me

 

 

 

 

This ongoing research continues on from my work with the Bell - Armstrong Connections.  

Foxton History

The history of the Foxton family dates back to at least the time of William the Conqueror in 1066, with Foxtons being mentioned in the Domesday Book in the Cambridgeshire, Leicestershire and North Riding indexes. The Book was commissioned  in 1085, and contains records for 13,418 settlements in the English counties. 

Members of many generations have written histories of their families. John Greenlaw Foxton in the 1800's wrote information regarding his family history.  John "Jack" Foxton in the 1920's wrote the following family outline to his niece, Ellen Foxton:-

Vitalia Palfrey, Lord of the Barony of Foxton  

 

            "Foxton Townlands in Leicestershire, England, at the time of William the Conqueror, held by Countess Judith, niece of William the Conqueror, widow of the first Earl of Northumberland who assigned the Barony to Vitalia Palfrey, Lord of the Barony of Foxton."

            "Listed in the book The Falaise Roll, in the listing of Personages Recorded in the Biographies at the Conquest of England not inscribed upon the Falaise Tablet, is found Vital.  Vital was a vassal of Odo, bishop of Bayeux, as is inscribed in Domesday, and was doubtless the individual of this name who witnessed an act proving that this bishop bought ground to enlarge his palace at Bayeux in 1078.  His name is woven in the Bayeux tapestry, where he is clearly indicated as having command of the scouts of Duke Williamís army on its arrival in England, keeping him constantly informed of the movements of the enemy.  He was apparently a person of considerable importance, although not mentioned by the chroniclers of the day.  A Vital who was a native of Tierceville, near Bayeux, and had formerly been chaplain of Robert, Count of Mortain, founded the celebrated abbey of Savigny in Normandy.  The name is inscribed on the Dives Roll.  The Bishop Odo is listed in one reference as being the nephew of William the Conqueror."

Spelling variations of the name include: Foxton, Foxtown, Foxtoun, and Foxon.

The Foxton name appears notably in the town of Foxton, Leicestershire and in the Foxton Staircase, a series of ten locks  in the the Grand Union Canal. The Foxton Locks are the largest flight of such staircase locks on the British canal system. Other interesting links include:-

This site focuses on the history of my family from William Foxton, born in 1725. Although the family trees list members of the family up to the present date, additional information about living family is not included.

I am particularly indebted to 

  • Susan Chabak for her contribution regarding the Foxtons from Wyoming,  as well as her knowledge of our common families in England
  • Mary C. Kelly (nee Foxton) and Alex and Meredith Foxton for their time and contributions.
  • Jean Harslett of the Stanthorpe Historical Museum
  • Bob Douglass for his extensive knowledge of the Robertson connections.
  • Julie Bright for her information about the Fox American connections
  • Helen Laidlaw for her information about the Dawson/Jones connections

Stephanie Kihlstrom

Last updated 14 June 2008